Sunday, March 6, 2016

Foam Rolling - What is it all about?



Have you seen people foam rolling in the gym before and wondered if this is just another fitness fad, or whether it's actually doing something?
But why is this so important?

Because your body's pain and limited range of motion could be preventing yourself from getting to the next level your training program

If you read my recent blog on how scars can leave lasting effects and cause chaos in the fascial network of the body, you'll understand how releasing scar tissue can stop the pain cycle and get to the next fitness level.

But, wait a minute…now you have to be wondering what releasing scar tissue has to do with anything, and where foam rolling fits into this equation?

Foam Rolling, also known as SELF Myofascial release can eliminate scar tissue and increase mobility through movements that require greater range of motion such as squats, or power cleans.
When you work on your MOBILITY,  you are in turn helping yourself to increase your strength, endurance and optimize your overall fitness performance.
If you aren’t convinced check out what the recent research has to say.
In a  recent study by Macdonald et al.,  the use of foam rollers was examined  as part of a warm up, maintenance and recovery technique to enhance muscular performance.  What they found will surprise you!
  • Timing: Results within this study showed an increase in knee joint range of motion after only TWO minutes of Foam Rolling.  A 12% increase in range of motion was noted in the quadriceps after only TEN minutes of foam rolling.
  • Density: Mechanical stress application was applied for only TWO minutes, but at very high intensity. The study found that with just an individual’s body mass and the density of the foam roller, the fascia was able to recreate its pliable structure.

This is great, right? Absolutely!  But you need to learn how you can implement this for yourself.  Here’s how:

1. Benefits of Foam Rolling

a. Promote flexibility around surrounding musculature
b. Dramatically increase mobility at, or around each joint
c. Improves force production through power moves such as squats and power cleans
d. Aids in muscular imbalances and repetitive stress on joints

2. Explain how beneficial Self Myofascial Release is for the body

This method helps increase mobility by breaking up scar tissue through the use of a foam roller for just several minutes.  Foam rolling directly after a training session promotes self-myofascial release, potentially improving flexibility and mobility!  The practice of foam rolling can be easily incorporated into your training sessions. Further, be sure to immediately foam rolling at cool down for 5 to 10 minutes to gain maximum benefits.   

3. Foam rolling exercise variations and recommend using various sized foam rollers, including the use of a high-density roller

This method helps increase mobility by breaking up scar tissue through the use of a foam roller for just several minutes.  Foam rolling directly after a training session promotes self-myofascial release, potentially improving flexibility and mobility!  The practice of foam rolling can be easily incorporated into your training sessions. Further, be sure to have immediately foam rolling at cool down for 5 to 10 minutes to gain maximum benefits.   
Below you can see just a few options for varying types of foam rollers. There is no doubt that foam rolling has benefits at any level within a training program. The illustrations below will give an idea on what foam rollers you should use at different training levels from beginner, intermediate and advanced foam rollers.  I would recommend a higher density roller when flexibility and pain are issues more than other things.
Foam rollers type differences

4. Foam Roller Technique Guide

The bottom line here is that foam rolling does have the potential to help your mobility, increase flexibility and minimize pain.  Don't hesitate any longer and get it rollin’ if you want to increase your strength and optimize upon your fitness performance.
Foam Roller Techniques

About Christina Klein

Christina is the owner of Locomotion Therapy and a master trainer with the ISSA. She has taught several courses with the ISSA for Personal Training, Strength and Conditioning, Youth Fitness, Senior Fitness and Exercise Therapy. She is also a certified massage practitioner specializing in Neurokinetic Therapy and Orthopedic Massage along with her Bachelor’s of Science in Kinesiology from Westmont College.
Christina has played at the collegiate tennis level for four years with Westmont College and enjoys integrating speed and agility into her training and tennis lessons. She understands the physical demands of being a competitive athlete and how important a consistent routine of conditioning, therapy and nutrition can help you achieve your goals and prevent reoccurring injury.

0 comments:

Post a Comment